jollyrogers777:

Runnnn

jollyrogers777:

Runnnn

(via tpe49)

(Source: omg-humor, via tpe49)

baronessvondengler:

Touché
delta-sigma-ipsil0n:

dewgonair:

lockrocksandcoke:

131-di:

veggiebaker:

therunscape:

Heart attacks symptoms are different for women. I recently learned this. 

Everyone should know these things.

thanks to mainstream media and being unable to show breasts on TV, way too few people know about female signs of cardiac distress, and impending heart attacks. they only know about the “pain in the left arm” male symptom.

i had all these symptoms once and they sent me right to hospital
it was scary bc i didnt know these were the symptoms for female heart issues

Please, please, PLEASE, reblog this. i don’t know if I did save or called false alarm, with my boss’ life tonight. I felt I was being a bit paranoid, overreacting, but I told Mirage my thoughts and he, after reading over the article I showed him, immediately sprung into action and then shooed her off to the hospital. I don’t know if I did or not, but I knew she’d been super stressed. She’d off-handedly commented on her arm tingling and I asked her if she felt queasy on a hunch. I went to look at the symptoms and we went from there.

from an EMT: cardiac problems often show up as initially breathing problems. a sudden shortness of air can be a sign for something wrong with the heart. dont hesitate to call 911 if you feel messed up like this.

delta-sigma-ipsil0n:

dewgonair:

lockrocksandcoke:

131-di:

veggiebaker:

therunscape:

Heart attacks symptoms are different for women. I recently learned this. 

Everyone should know these things.

thanks to mainstream media and being unable to show breasts on TV, way too few people know about female signs of cardiac distress, and impending heart attacks. they only know about the “pain in the left arm” male symptom.

i had all these symptoms once and they sent me right to hospital

it was scary bc i didnt know these were the symptoms for female heart issues

Please, please, PLEASE, reblog this. i don’t know if I did save or called false alarm, with my boss’ life tonight. I felt I was being a bit paranoid, overreacting, but I told Mirage my thoughts and he, after reading over the article I showed him, immediately sprung into action and then shooed her off to the hospital. I don’t know if I did or not, but I knew she’d been super stressed. She’d off-handedly commented on her arm tingling and I asked her if she felt queasy on a hunch. I went to look at the symptoms and we went from there.

from an EMT: cardiac problems often show up as initially breathing problems. a sudden shortness of air can be a sign for something wrong with the heart. dont hesitate to call 911 if you feel messed up like this.

(via jackthevulture)

madelinekahns:

Madeline Kahn photographed by Bonnie Schiffman for “The Rollingstone Book of Comedy, 1991

I love her so much!

madelinekahns:

Madeline Kahn photographed by Bonnie Schiffman for “The Rollingstone Book of Comedy, 1991

I love her so much!

(via theprettiestthingsihavefound)

cyrail:

theartofanimation:

Jordan Grimmer

Reblogged by Cyrail: Inspiring artworks that make your day better

(via jackthevulture)

What can we do? We can start by guarding our own language. When our day at the beach is canceled because of rain and we end up staying home, how often do we say, “I was so depressed”? Depression is more than simply a disappointment or a day in a funk. When we use that terminology to describe the daily ups and downs, the disappointment and aggravations, we unwittingly minimize true depression.

When we see that a loved one is feeling depressed, seems unable to get up in the morning, unwilling to go out, how do we respond? How often do we simply encourage our friend to “cheer up”, “treat yourself to a shopping spree”, “go out to eat”? Or we point out “you have so much to be grateful for”, “so many people have it so much worse”. These well-meaning statements imply that depression is something that can be overcome simply by a change in attitude, by a force of will, by determination.

This encouragement - while well-meaning - fails to recognize that depression is an illness and unwittingly blames the sufferer. If only she tried harder, if only he made the effort, the depression would disappear. We do not expect the diabetic to cure herself, the person with epilepsy to force the seizures to stop, and we should not assume that depression can simply be lifted with effort.

Rabbi Betsy Torop

This was my rabbi’s sermon last Friday at Shabbat services.  It’s finally gone up on our temple’s website, and it is awesome.  I was literally in tears.

(via actuallyclintbarton)

beachnymph

(Source: fankakm, via jackthevulture)

(Source: fankakm, via jackthevulture)